Falling on your face hurts, but failure holds a valuable lesson…if you choose to learn from it. In today’s society, we teach our children that bullying is wrong, which it is. The problem is teaching our kids how to be a victim

and not how to cope. Obviously bullying is wrong, the recipients of bullying can grow stronger if supported by a strong adult and mindset.

Adults are no different. I see so many adults, even myself included at times, scared about change, scared about taking a first step, scared of failure. If you don’t want to fail, do nothing, but at the end of the day don’t complain about not succeeding.
I’ve failed before. I’ve failed as a son, a brother, a husband, a father, and also as a leader. As I’ve gotten older and more experienced, I’ve also learned the value of failure. We’ve heard fail fast, meaning to not be afraid of failure but embrace the lessons that come with it. You can learn more from failure than you can from success. Probably because it hurts more.
One of my more memorable failures is not being selected for a position that would have set my family up very nicely financially. I thought for sure that position was mine. The only problem was that I started making mistakes and slipping to fix the mistakes. Needless to say, I wasn’t selected and I was crushed. I felt as though I let my family down and was ashamed and embarrassed. I blamed everyone…but myself. As time moved on, I realized that the only person to blame was myself. Once I accepted the responsibility of failure as mine, I changed. I started patching up the trouble areas in my professional and personal life. I dedicated the rest of my career to those around me and vowed to work harder every day to become a better version of myself tomorrow. I may never get an opportunity like that job presented again. But I believe that everything works out and God has a plan. So I keep my head up looking for opportunities at all times.

Read Extreme Ownership by Jocko Willink and Leif Babin. You can find more on this book on the “Books” page under “Mind.” This book reinforced my thoughts about taking ownership over everything within my control and that anything you have influence over inherits your responsibility.

As quoted from Rocky Balboa, and I swear this will stand the test of time, “Let me tell you something you already know. The world ain’t all sunshine and rainbows. It’s a very mean and nasty place, and I don’t care how tough you are, it will beat you to your knees and keep you there permanently if you let it. You, me, or nobody is gonna hit as hard as life. But it ain’t about how hard you hit. It’s about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward; how much you can take and keep moving forward. That’s how winning is done! Now, if you know what you’re worth, then go out and get what you’re worth. But you gotta be willing to take the hits, and not pointing fingers saying you ain’t where you wanna be because of him, or her, or anybody. Cowards do that and that ain’t you. You’re better than that!

I implore you to watch this clip if you haven’t done so already. And if you haven’t seen Rocky Balboa, what the hell is wrong with you?

What are your thoughts on lessons learned from failure? Let’s start a conversation that everyone can use by leave a comment below!
%d bloggers like this: